IEEE Adds to Its Life Sciences Standards

Several new ones are available, with more on the way

7 December 2012

The IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) has been developing new life sciences standards to add to its IEEE 11073 series. This family of standards is designed to help health care product developers build instruments and systems for disease management, physical fitness, and independent living. Two new standards and a revised one have been added, with several more on the way. They are sponsored by the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society.

IEEE 11073-00103
Released August 2012

The “Guide for Health Informatics —Personal Health Device Communication—Overview” profiles communications among personal telehealth instruments monitoring a patient’s health. The profiles define data representation, data exchange, and communications between telehealth instruments and such tools as cellphones, personal computers, and TV set-top boxes.


IEEE 11073-10103
Released August 2012

The “Standard for Health Informatics—Point-of-Care Medical Device Communication—​
Nomenclature—Implantable Device, Cardiac” defines terms for implantable pacemakers, defibrillators, cardiac monitors, and tools for cardiac-resynchronization therapy.


IEEE 11073-10417
Released January 2012

This revision to the “Standard for Health Informatics—Personal Health Device Communication—Part 10417: Device Specialization—Glucose Meter” supports plug-and-play interoperability between personal glucose meters and compute engines.


The following projects are under development. If approved by the IEEE-SA Standards Board, they will also be added to the IEEE 11073 family.

IEEE P11073-10419
The “Draft Standard for Health Informatics—Personal Health Device Communication—Device Specialization—Insulin Pump” specifies the possibilities of information exchange between interoperable insulin pumps.


IEEE P11073-10441
This revision to the “Draft Standard for Health Informatics—Personal Health Device Communication—Part 10441: Device Specialization—Cardiovascular Fitness and Activity Monitor” supports interoperable communications among devices that measure a person’s activity and the body’s physiological responses to it.


IEEE P11073-10404
This revision to the “Draft Standard for Health Informatics—Personal Health Device Communication—Device
Specialization—Pulse Oxi­meter” defines the communications between pulse-oximeter devices and compute engines. Pulse oximeters monitor the saturation of a patient’s hemoglobin.


IEEE P11073-10413
The “Draft Standard for Health Informatics—Personal Health Device Communication—Device Specialization—Respiration Rate Monitor” defines plug-and-play communications between compute engines and devices that monitor respiration rate.


For more information on these and other standards, visit the Personal Health Device Working Group website.

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