Video Celebrates Pride in IEEE

Aims to help members feel proud of the organization and to spread awareness of engineering's impact on society

6 February 2009

A new video aims to make those in the technology community who belong to IEEE feel proud to be part of the organization—and encourage those who are not affiliated with IEEE to feel good about the contributions of technology to society. The 6.5-minute video, “IEEE: One Voice for Engineering, Computing, Technological Innovation,” was produced by the IEEE Public Visibility Initiative Ad-hoc Committee, under the leadership of its 2008 chair, Leah Jamieson. The goal of the Public Visibility Initiative is to increase IEEE’s visibility and facilitate public understanding of how engineering, computing, and technology benefit humanity.

The video uses IEEE members to highlight four themes that define IEEE and its influence in the world and on technology. The themes are: IEEE is one voice for engineering, computing, and technological innovation; it is engineering a better tomorrow; it is inspiring innovation for the global community; and it is advancing creativity and technological excellence. The individuals represent the diverse nature of the member base, in global and technological dimensions. Among those participating in the video are: Jon Peha, chief technologist with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission; Victor Lawrence, professor of electrical engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology and the 2007 IEEE Simon Ramo Medal recipient; Gus Anderson, an electrical and computer engineering student at Drexel University; Vinton Cerf, vice president of Google and its chief Internet evangelist; and Wole Akpose, chief information security officer at Morgan State University, in Baltimore, among others.

IEEE is encouraging the video to be shown at multiple venues, including conferences, meetings, and special events such as the 125th anniversary events being held around the globe.

The DVD is being distributed broadly throughout IEEE, and it can be downloaded. It’s available in formats compatible with NTSC and PAL, or WMV files for use in PowerPoint presentations. The video is not so long that it can’t usually be played in its entirety, but a two-minute version is also available.

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