Member Recognitions: January 2010

These IEEE members recently were recognized for their work by other organizations

8 January 2010

The Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards Corp., Los Angeles, has honored Senior Member Emilio Sovero with its Outstanding Technical Achievement Award. He was cited for his “significant contributions to science, engineering, and technology” and for his work overseeing the development of space systems.

Sovero is chief scientist at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems mixed signal and power center, in Manhattan Beach, Calif., where he is involved in several projects. He oversees research on analog-to-information, converter-based receivers used in space systems. The receivers must allow for high dynamic range digitization and broad frequency coverage. He is also program manager of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s Analog-to-Information Receiver Development program.

Sovero is a member of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits, Electron Devices, and Microwave Theory and Techniques societies.

 

The National Academy of Engineering presented IEEE Honorary Member Sheila Widnall with its Arthur M. Bueche Award for “a remarkable academic career in fluid dynamics combined with the highest levels of public service, and for championing the role of women in engineering.” The award honors an engineer who is involved in advising on U.S. science and technology policy, promoting technological development, and contributing to the relationships between industry, government, and academia.

Widnall is a professor of aeronautics and astronautics at MIT, where her research focuses on fluid dynamics, including boundary layer stability and unsteady lifting-surface theory. She is a former secretary of the U.S. Air Force, serving from 1993 to 1997. She cochaired the Department of Defense task force on discrimination and sexual harassment, which studied the military’s equal-opportunity system for women.

 

The New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame honored IEEE Member Ziqian Dong with its Graduate Student Award for her work on network switch architecture. The Hall of Fame promotes the role of inventors in improving society and changing lives. The award was established in 2005 to recognize graduate students working on innovative technologies.

Dong is a postdoctoral researcher in the electrical and computer engineering department at Stevens Institute of Technology, in Hoboken, N.J. Her research includes Internet forensics, network security and management, and high-speed-switch architecture design. She is currently designing an online deception-detection system to identify suspicious or fraudulent behavior on the Internet.

Dong is a member of the IEEE Communications Society and IEEE Women in Engineering group.

 

Fellow George D. Peterson has been honored with the Linton E. Grinter Distinguished Service Award by ABET. The award recognizes contributions to ABET-related activities.

Peterson was cited for “his extraordinary vision that made ABET a global leader in the determination of quality in higher education in general, and in the disciplines that ABET accredits in particular.” He also was recognized for his volunteer work for the organization, and for serving as its executive director for more than 15 years, ending in 2008.

A former chair of the department of electrical engineering at the U.S. Naval Academy, in Annapolis, Md., and assistant vice president for academic affairs and professor of electrical engineering at Morgan State University, in Baltimore, he is currently ABET’s managing director for international business development.

He has helped organize several agreements between the organization and other international accreditation systems. The agreements call for graduates from universities in countries participating in the agreements to receive equal rights and privileges. That includes making it possible to transfer credits when students switch to a university in another country that has signed the agreement.

Peterson is a member of the IEEE Education Society.

 

Life Member Robert L. Byer has been named chairman of the board at Mobius Photonics of Santa Clara, Calif. Byer cofounded the company, which produces fiber-based laser sources, in 2005.

He is a professor of applied physics at Stanford University, where his research focuses on the development of nonlinear optical materials and solid-state laser sources for applications to gravitational wave detection and to laser particle acceleration.

Byer is a member of the IEEE Photonics Society.

 

Fellow H. Vincent Poor has been selected as one of three international Fellows of the U.K. Royal Academy of Engineering. He was cited as being a “world-leading engineering researcher and educator in signal processing, wireless communications, and related fields.” The Royal Academy aims to recognize excellence in engineering, lead international debate on engineering topics, and influence public policy.

Poor is dean of Princeton University’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, as well as a professor of electrical engineering there. He is widely recognized as one of the world's leading engineering educators. The undergraduate course he developed, “The Wireless Revolution,” has been hailed by engineering professors worldwide as a model for teaching the technical, political, economic, and social implications of wireless communications to students in both engineering and liberal arts fields.

His contributions to robust statistical signal processing, multiuser detection, and non-Gaussian signal processing have led to advances in wireless communications.

Poor is a member of the IEEE Signal Processing, Control Systems, Communications, Information Theory, and Education societies.

 

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