E-books Cover Electric Transportation

Download them from the IEEE Xplore Digital Library

7 April 2014

Here’s a sample of IEEE e-books that focus on transportation electrification. To view the books, log in to the IEEE Xplore Digital Library and click on “Books & eBooks” in the left-hand navigation menu. You can then browse or search by title and download a PDF of an excerpt or of selected chapters. To order the books, visit Wiley.com.

chao

Remote Sensing and Actuation Using Unmanned Vehicles
By Haiyang Chao and YangQuan Chen (2012)

A practical guide to the design and use of unmanned vehicles for remote sensing and actuation so as to replace human beings in dangerous, tedious, or repetitive jobs. Such vehicles are increasingly used in river/reservoir surveillance and for the monitoring and control of chemical/nuclear leaks. The book, available for US $99.95, also deals with small, unmanned aerial vehicles for remote sensing.

The following three e-books are free.

Nebeker

Dawn of the Electronic Age: Electrical Technologies in the Shaping of the Modern World, 1914 to 1945
By Frederik Nebeker (2009)

A comprehensive account of electrical and electronics history from the start of World War I to the end of World War II. Military vehicles and private passenger cars gained wide use during this period due to advances in engines, car radios, and wire-based technologies.

Morchin

Electric Bicycles: A Guide to Design and Use
By William C. Morchin and Henry Oman (2006)

Provides instructions on building a battery-powered bicycle. Describes how to optimize performance so as to travel long distances at higher speeds and in challenging circumstances, including heavy winds and steep hills.

Kowalick

Fatal Exit: The Automotive Black Box Debate
By Thomas M. Kowalick (2004)

Discusses the privacy concerns surrounding event data recorders, better known as automotive “black boxes.” EDRs collect information on a vehicle’s operation, such as its speed and whether safety features like brakes and seatbelts are in use. The author traces the history of EDRs and presents opposing views for putting, or not putting, the technology in automobiles. For more, see “Keeping Your Car’s Data Private.”

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